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AGGRESSIVE BACK FIST

Most kung fu styles incorporate the back fist in their systems however the way that it is utilized can be a shock when it is transferred to a real life fight situation and you realize that your whipping back fist you threw just got exchanged for a simple block and loaded punch counter or indeed caught and spun into a lock.

I don't mean to sound negative about using the back fist this way as indeed it can be effective as a lead in stinging strike or to shift your opponents focus of defense leading you to kick at the knees for example.

What I would like you to try is to use a back fist that is more aggressive and will literally drive through your opponents guard. The way to do it is very simple and very effective as you will see:

From a Bong Sau position pull back the forearm and roll the upper arm clockwise from a 6 o'clock position through to a 12 o'clock position and drop your elbow through your opponents defense with enough power that you are literally driving their arm down and away. Keeping you arm bent as you follow through with the back fist will ensure that you have a strong arm (if you encounter a back fist with a straight arm you can make a short blow to the elbow which will have devastating effects) and strike with the knuckles and the front of the fist and not with the back of the hand as this again is weak and if you do not connect properly or your hand is not conditioned to this strike then you could injure your hand easily when you connect with a solid target.

In summary:

1. You are loading the strike with a twist from the bong sau and the pull back of the forearm.

2.You roll your elbow over your opponents defense and power through it with your elbow.

3. Keep you arm bent for strength and power to the strike.

4. Hit through the target with the knuckles and front of your fist.

I am sure that you can see that this is a much more aggressive move than a standard kung fu back fist and when used sparingly can prove a useful tool to have in your armour.

by Glenn Hodgkinson

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